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International Legal Research: Home

This guide will serve a beginning set of resources for those legal researchers who are searching in the field of international law. It will focus on finding treaties and other international agreements.

International Legal Research

This guide will serve as an introduction or beginning set of resources for those legal researchers who are searching in the field of international law.  It will focus on finding treaties and other international agreements.  It provides sources, print and electronic, that are available in the University of New Hampshire Law Library and through its licensed electronic subscriptions. It is a work in progress and will be edited irregularly.   Pages for international criminal law and international IP are being developed. 

Textbooks on International Legal Research

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UNH Franklin Pierce Law students will need their UNH email credentials to logon for the ebooks.

Selected Books on International Law

Selected Blogs on International Law

Subject Guide

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Sue Zago
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UNH Law Library
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Sources of International Law

When researching international law issues, Article 38 of the International Court of Justice Statute lists the sources of international law in order of their weight as authority:

  1. International conventions and treaties
  2. International custom as evidence of a general practice accepted as law
  3. General principles of law recognized by civilized nations (doctrines of fairness and justice applied universally in legal systems throughout the world)
  4. Judicial decisions and teachings of the most highly qualified publicists

The first three sources are primary sources while judicial decisions and teachings of the most highly qualified publications are treated as secondary sources.