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Juneteenth : Home

Celebrating Juneteenth

Picture Gallery

Juneteenth Silhouette
2020 Juneteenth Celebration

Events along the Black Lives Matter Plaza at the 2020 Juneteenth Celebration

Carol M. Highsmith, photographer - June, 19, 2020, https://www.loc.gov/item/2020720126/

Juneteenth Flag

Juneteenth Flag, Nafsadh, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Juneteenth_Flag.svg

Juneteenth Memorial Monument at George Washington Carver Museum, Austin, TX

Juneteenth Memorial Monument at George Washington Carver Museum, Austin, TX

Jennifer Rangubphai, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

The Fifteenth Amendment, Celebrated May 19th 1870

A reduced version of Kelly's large print "The Fifteenth Amendment, Celebrated May 19th 1870" (no. 1870-4), with a key to the picture added in the lower margin. See https://loc.getarchive.net/media/the-fifteenth-amendment-1

Introduction - "All Slaves are Free"

Juneteenth is also known as Emancipation Day, Juneteenth Independence Day, and Black Independence Day.  In addition to marking the end of slavery in the United States, Juneteenth is a day of remembrance and an opportunity for African-Americans to honor their history and celebrate Black culture.

Ashton Villa, in Galveston, Texas.  Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, 2012. Highsmith Archives. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

 

 

 

Ashton Villa, in Galveston, Texas.

Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, 2012. Highsmith Archives. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

 

 

Union General Gordon Granger and his troops traveled to Galveston, Texas to announce General Order No. 3 on June 19th, 1865. General Order #3″ carried the message of the Emancipation Proclamation to Texas and was read aloud from the balcony of Ashton Villa in Galveston when slaves in that state at last learned that they were free. 

General Order No. 3

The people are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property, between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them, become that between employer and hired labor. The freed are advised to remain at their present homes, and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts; and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

Although the Emancipation Proclamation was formally issued on January 1, 1863, the news of it had not reached slaves in most of Texas. Union troops then needed to enforce this order throughout a large state, so that slaves were not all released on the same day in Texas — but the 19th is the day that is commemorated. Spontaneous celebrations broke out as the news spread, and these gave rise to an annual events to mark the day. As some of these freed slaves traveled to nearby states to find relatives, they carried the tradition of celebrating June 19th with them and over time it spread to all fifty states." Library of Congress Blog: Juneteenth

UNH President Announces Observance of Juneteenth

President Dean Announces Juneteenth as New University Holiday

Sept. 18, 2020

President Dean announced on September 17, 2020, the outcome of an historic vote by the University System of New Hampshire Board of Trustees. At the request of the University System of New Hampshire presidents the board unanimously agreed to add Juneteenth as a recognized holiday in the university’s schedule. In addition to marking the end of slavery in the United States, Juneteenth is a day of remembrance and an opportunity for African-Americans to honor their history and celebrate Black culture. Recognizing this day reflects our deep commitment to and support of our multicultural communities across our campuses. 

Official Announcement 

Is Juneteenth a Federal Holiday?

Yes, as of 6/17/2021 - Juneteenth is a federal holiday! 

On June 15, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed S.475 to make Juneteenth a federal holiday.  The House of Representatives has passed the bill on June 16, 2021. President Biden signed the bill into law on 6/17/2021. 

In addition to Juneteenth being the newest federal holiday, most states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation recognizing it as a holiday or observance.  The Congressional Research Service provides a list of states who have proclaimed Juneteenth as a holiday with their corresponding legislation.  On June 19, 2019, Governor Chris Sununu signed SB174 into law, proclaiming an annual observance of Juneteenth in New Hampshire. 

Is Juneteenth a recognized holiday in New Hampshire?

New Hampshire state law recognizes 10 federal holidays, plus Election Day. While public schools and state offices close for these days the New Hampshire state law does not require employers to recognize these holidays, although many do.

The governor can proclaim special celebration days or “observances,” independently or with the Legislature. These state recognized days require the public to remember, observe and celebrate with appropriate festivities.

In the 2019 Session of the New Hampshire State Legislature, Senate Bill 174 was signed by Governor Sununu on June 19, 2019.  This bill states that " [t]he governor shall annually issue a proclamation calling for the proper observance of June 19 as Juneteenth and shall call on the citizens of New Hampshire to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities commemorating the abolition of slavery." It is codified into RSA 4:13-aa.  

Gov. Sununu's 2020 Juneteenth proclamation 

Gov. Sununu signs bill declaring Juneteenth a state holiday, Fosters Democrat, June 19, 2019